Femtosecond-Laser-Assisted LASIK Eye Surgery and Imaging

Femtosecond-Laser-Assisted LASIK Eye Surgery and Imaging
Author(s):    Hui Sun
Published:   2015
DOI:             10.1117/3.2205866
eISBN: 9781628416749
Description:

Over the last decade, the field of femtosecond eye surgery has expanded rapidly, supporting the advantage of combined high ablation precision and minimized collateraltissue effects. One of the most promising applications for femtosecond laser eye surgery has been corneal surgery, namely laser in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgery, where the high-pressure laser plasma non-thermally dissociates the dense corneal tissue thereby enabling lamellar cornea procedures with minimized side effects and subsequent excimer laser shapes the cornea surface. Millions of people worldwide had been patient for LASIK surgery and benefitted from such new technology. More and more interests were shown on this surgery and people want to know more about this surgery itself and research beneath it. LASIK surgery includes three parts: wavefront detection, femtosecond laser flap creation and excimer laser cornea correction. This special issue focuses on femtosecond laser assisted LASIK surgery, content includes basic research for femtosecond laser eye surgery and femtosecond laser eye tissue imaging.

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When light from a star or another astronomical object enters the Earth’s atmosphere, atmospheric turbulence will distort the image. Images produced by any telescope larger than a certain size are blurred by these distortions. In order to overcome this effect from atmospheric turbulence, the idea of adaptive optics (AO) has been introduced into the field of astronomy. The principle of AO can be described in two steps: the first step is measuring an incoming wavefront by a wavefront sensor and the second step is correcting the deformations of an incoming wavefront by deforming a mirror in order to compensate for the distortion introduced by atmospheric turbulence. AO works by measuring the distortions in a wavefront and compensating for them with a device that corrects those errors as does a deformable mirror. This technology has been widely used for improving the resolution of ground-based telescopes since being proposed by Babcock.

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