Excerpt

According to Webster’s dictionary, the word “tomography” is derived from the Greek word “tomos” to describe “a technique of x-ray photography by which a single plane is photographed, with the outline of structures in other planes eliminated. This concise definition illustrates the fundamental limitations of the conventional radiograph: superposition and conspicuity due to overlapping structures. In conventional radiography, as illustrated in Fig. 1.1(a), the three-dimensional (3D) volume of a human body is compressed along the direction of the x ray to a two-dimensional (2D) image. All underlying bony structures and tissues are superimposed, which results in significantly reduced visibility of the object of interest.


Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.