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2 November 1979 Impact Of RAM Multiported Memories On Interactive Digital Image Processing Systems
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Abstract
This document describes the architecture and design philosophy of the COMTAL Vision One/20 digital image processing system. The Vision One/20 is a dual ported RAM refresh memory system which affords multiple user access to a common expandable data base (4096x4096x8 bit pixel memory images are available) with dynamic partitioning to afford a multiplicity of different applications. Real time roaming with a window size of up to 1024x1024 pixels through the data base is possible with zooming and 3x3 convolution all implementable in 1/30 second. With graphics overlay memories, annotation, labeling, outlining and arbitrarily shaped multiple small area monochrome or color correction are possible. Due to the dynamic allocation of the data base memory, digital loop movies in real-time are possible as is left-right, right-left, up-down or down-up scrolling of new imagery into the refresh memory and viewing window. These and other features are expanded upon herein. Pipeline processors, freeze frame iterative image array feedback, firmware-burned control and instruction com-mands are descriptive of modern image processing architectures used in the Vision One/20.
© (1979) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Donald R. Fanshier and Harry C. Andrews "Impact Of RAM Multiported Memories On Interactive Digital Image Processing Systems", Proc. SPIE 0199, Advances in Display Technology, (2 November 1979); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.958041
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