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21 March 1997 Three-dimensional anthropometric techniques applied to the fabrication of burn masks and the quantification of wound healing
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Proceedings Volume 3023, Three-Dimensional Image Capture; (1997) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.269764
Event: Electronic Imaging '97, 1997, San Jose, CA, United States
Abstract
Anthropometric surveys conducted by the military provide comprehensive human body measurement data that are human interface requirements for successful mission performance of weapon systems, including cockpits, protective equipment, and clothing. The application of human body dimensions to model humans and human-machine performance begins with engineering anthropometry. There are two critical elements to engineering anthropometry: data acquisition and data analysis. First, the human body is captured dimensionally with either traditional anthropometric tools, such as calipers and tape measures, or with advanced image acquisition systems, such as a laser scanner. Next, numerous statistical analysis tools, such as multivariate modeling and feature envelopes, are used to effectively transition these data for design and evaluation of equipment and work environments. Recently, Air Force technology transfer allowed researchers at the Computerized Anthropometric Research and Design (CARD) Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base to work with the Dayton, Ohio area medical community in assessing the rate of wound healing and improving the fit of total contract burn masks. This paper describes the successful application of CARD Lab engineering anthropometry to two medically oriented human interface problems.
© (1997) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Jennifer J. Whitestone, Glen R. Geisen, and Barbara K. McQuiston "Three-dimensional anthropometric techniques applied to the fabrication of burn masks and the quantification of wound healing", Proc. SPIE 3023, Three-Dimensional Image Capture, (21 March 1997); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.269764
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