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19 January 1984 Preliminary Scientific Results From The First Six Months Of The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS)
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Abstract
The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) was successfully launched on 25 January 1983. The goals of this joint US, Dutch, and British project were twofold. The first, and most important, goal was to perform an unbiased all-sky survey at wavelengths of 12, 25, 60, and 100 ,μm to establish the importance of infrared emission in the energy balance of the universe, to map the diffuse emission from the Galaxy and the material in the solar system, and to obtain low resolution spectra of the brightest sources identified at 12 and 25 4m. A second mission objective was to study specific known astronomical objects in more detail to gain higher sensitivity or higher spatial resolution than that achievable by normal survey observations.
© (1984) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
B. T. Soifer, C. A. Beichman, J. R. Houck, G. Neugebauer, and M. Rowan-Robinson "Preliminary Scientific Results From The First Six Months Of The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS)", Proc. SPIE 0430, Infrared Technology IX, (19 January 1984); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.936401
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