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9 January 1984 The First Orbiting Astronomical Infrared Telescope System - Its Development And Performance
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Abstract
The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) was launched on January 25, 1983, and has provided astronomers with their first extended views of the universe in the 8 to 120 micron wavelength region. The infrared telescope system is one of several United States contribu-tions to this international project sponsored by the U.S.A., The Netherlands, and the U.K. This telescope employs four bands of detectors cooled to 2.4 K to achieve a noise equivalent flux density in the 10-18 to 10-19 watts/cm 2 range and will operate for approximately eleven months before depletion of its supply of superfluid helium. This paper describes major problems, early flight results and technical lessons learned during the course of the telescope's development and flight operations.
© (1984) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Allan G Conrad and William R Irace "The First Orbiting Astronomical Infrared Telescope System - Its Development And Performance", Proc. SPIE 0445, Instrumentation in Astronomy V, (9 January 1984); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.966153
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