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12 August 2004 Understanding radiative transfer in the midwave infrared: a precursor to full-spectrum atmospheric compensation
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Abstract
The compensation for atmospheric effects in the VNIR/SWIR has reached a mature stage of development with many algorithms available for application (ATREM, FLAASH, ACORN, etc.). Compensation of LWIR data is the focus of a number of promising algorithms. A gap in development exists in the MWIR where little or no atmospheric compensation work has been done yet an increased interest in MWIR applications is emerging. To obtain atmospheric compensation over the full spectrum (visible through LWIR), a better understanding of the radiative effects in the MWIR is needed. The MWIR is characterized by a unique combination of reduced solar irradiance and low thermal emission (for typical emitting surfaces), both providing relatively equal contributions to the daytime MWIR radiance. In the MWIR and LWIR, the compensation problem can be viewed as two interdependent processes: compensation for the effects of the atmosphere and the uncoupling of the surface temperature and emissivity. The former requires calculations of the atmospheric transmittance due to gases, aerosols, and thin clouds and the path radiance directed towards the sensor (both solar scattered and thermal emissions in the MWIR). A framework for a combined MWIR/LWIR compensation approach is presented where both scattering and absorption by atmospheric particles and gases are considered.
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Michael K. Griffin, Hsiao-hua K. Burke, and John P. Kerekes "Understanding radiative transfer in the midwave infrared: a precursor to full-spectrum atmospheric compensation", Proc. SPIE 5425, Algorithms and Technologies for Multispectral, Hyperspectral, and Ultraspectral Imagery X, (12 August 2004); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.543526
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