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16 May 2013 Enhanced vision flight deck technology for commercial aircraft low-visibility surface operations
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Abstract
NASA Langley Research Center and the FAA collaborated in an effort to evaluate the effect of Enhanced Vision (EV) technology display in a commercial flight deck during low visibility surface operations. Surface operations were simulated at the Memphis, TN (FAA identifier: KMEM) airfield during nighttime with 500 Runway Visual Range (RVR) in a high-fidelity, full-motion simulator. Ten commercial airline flight crews evaluated the efficacy of various EV display locations and parallax and minification effects. The research paper discusses qualitative and quantitative results of the simulation experiment, including the effect of EV display placement on visual attention, as measured by the use of non-obtrusive oculometry and pilot mental workload. The results demonstrated the potential of EV technology to enhance situation awareness which is dependent on the ease of access and location of the displays. Implications and future directions are discussed.
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Jarvis J. Arthur III, R. Michael Norman, Lynda J. Kramer, Lawerence J. Prinzel III, Kyle K. Ellis, Stephanie J. Harrison, and J. Ray Comstock "Enhanced vision flight deck technology for commercial aircraft low-visibility surface operations", Proc. SPIE 8737, Degraded Visual Environments: Enhanced, Synthetic, and External Vision Solutions 2013, 873707 (16 May 2013); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2016386
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